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Ubisoft – Ghost Recon: Future Soldier (Fail) Mouse/Control Problems

I have to plop in my thoughts on a game I’ve been all excited in playing, Ghost Recon: Future Soldier on PC even on a menstrual blog because of how outraged I am. Having tweeted in the past about Ubisoft’s failure with a game called ANNO 2070 where it would require you to have a persistent internet connection to play, their commitment to failure has not ceased. In ANNO 2070, being offline would kill a variety of critical game mechanics and features. Though this is supposed to act a deterrent for those who illegally download the game, it also serves as a huge inconvenience to those who purchase it legally. With that said, those who pirated the game were much better off because it allowed people who didn’t always have a permanent internet connection to play. Point noted is that their aggressive attempts failed miserably… in fact, it solidified many opinions of my friends and I on why we should bother paying a company to release a game in which we didn’t have the “right” to play anytime, anywhere. Doesn’t it make more sense to pay $0 and have MORE rights to the game than those who paid $50?

In the past few days since the release of GR:FS Ubisoft has been “so-called” listening to the feedback of fans about the game and bugs which have cropped up. These “grand production” of games somehow pass QA when basic functionality such as keyboard/mouse fail to operate correctly when playing the game. Some people have mentioned that having any additional controllers plugged in may supersede the keyboard/mouse controls, but having unplugged all my “accessories”, the game continues to act as if I have a XBOX controller plugged in an refuse to allow my mouse to move the directional facing of my character. How did QA/Testers not see this bug? 2 patches which I’m aware of has been released, 1.1 and 1.2… none of which truly addresses the controller issue. I understand that fixing other components of the game is important, however, when your fans can’t even play the game – what does it matter if you’re “improving performance” and “enhancing gameplay”? WHAT GAMEPLAY?

Many sites such as this one recommend people hold off on buying the game, particularly for the European launch happening tomorrow (Friday). Why would you even want to support a company which screws you for your money? They’re making futile attempts to “smooth things out” with many of their customers by offering this game a one-time DRM activation requirement. I have not had any fun with this game at all, why? Because I can’t even play the game unless I’d like to only be staring straight in front of me at all times while getting shot from the side and not being able to retaliate.

Ubisoft is exactly the reason why consumers should be looking to their local pirating sources for the game, rather than paying for a product which you are crippled from using. Shit, the pirates might provider a better fix than the game maker would! Porting a game is bad enough when there are so many remnants of the console configurations lying about, but it’s worse when a game detects things that aren’t there or refuse to accept input from other devices.

I like how a Ubisoft publisher representative has ‘pledged to fix a critical bug which prevents PC users from playing the game’. Did you really need to pledge or promise something like that? This isn’t just a nuisance/bug that can be overlooked, this makes the game UNPLAYABLE. If they didn’t bother addressing it and addressing it damn soon what makes them think that consumers are stupid enough to pay for a non-working product (ok well there will always be a few fan-tards)? Even just by DELAYING a fix like this they’ve probably lost tons of customers who were going to pay for the product instead of downloading it.

Congratulations to all the people who “acquired” the game through alternate sources than paying Ubisoft.

As we all know UBI loves to blame PC game delays on piracy. Clearly it’s not a piracy issue, it’s an incompetence issue. This game is NOT finished

– Forum User

I must point out their lovely “workarounds” as well… oh right, because they’re too incompetent to release a product which works for gamers computers (probably their target market) who usually will have multiple input devices attached. In order to play the game, I will need to:

  • The game is running with keyboard/mouse OR gamepad. In order to lay with the Keyboard/mouse you should remove all other peripherals (game pads, joysticks, wheels etc).
  • If you had a controller installed on the PC please try to uninstall the controller drivers.

So…. it’s bad enough I have to go to the back of my computer cabinet to unhook/hook up any other input devices than my keyboard/mouse before and after gameplay, but I even need to uninstall my drivers? Good lord!

Fix your god damn product and because of your incompetence, I really hope most people will avoid buying your shoddy software and just pirate it… just like you deserve. They’ll probably use this as an excuse to go back to DRM… lol!

Does Your In-Game Habits Say Something About You?

I just thought of this really interesting topic and I’m no sure if a lot of other sites have covered it already – but this dawned upon me as I was playing some games a few weeks ago. Of course this isn’t the first time I’ve thought of it, but it is the first time I’m writing about it. For avid gamers, some may always pick particular “races”, “classes” or “alignment” to play because of particular strengths and weaknesses provided to the player. By far, I will say of every RPG game (single/multiplayer) I’ve played, I have always favoured using long-range characters such as ranger, hunter or shooter classes and erring on the side of stealth-based character attributes.

A couple months ago, when bebe and I were playing The Sims together, I found out she’s different with her approaches to gaming. Rather than it being a manifest of her, she likes to show her “creative” side when it comes to gaming. She prefers not to build her Sims and lifestyle as a replica of her and we debated whether we would actually use her name as her sim-name. Me on the other hand, when I play games like The Sims, I like to replicate my existing or future lifestyle/housing and although I let my creativity soar when it comes to furniture, house size and stuff, I play the characters very-much like my own mentality, attributes, likes/dislikes, occupation, etc.

Something like this made me wonder, do games bring out a subconscious part of us or is it simply what it is… a game?I must admit personally, my in-game gaming habits tend to be a pretty good representation of myself. I enjoy game series like Hitman and Splinter Cell, because they cater to us gamers who prefer stealth and tact over direct confrontation. I like the idea of popping down behind someone and slitting their throat versus running in a full room of baddies, guns a-blazing. Whether it be in game or in person, this “hidden” personality of mine shows through. I remember playing “tag” as a child, I’d much prefer hiding and sneaking around and tagging a person than running a-muck trying to catch whoever I could. I also avoid confrontation when the situation presents itself or use conversation as a method to my advantage (even if it results in violence in the end).

You may call stealth cowardice... I call it SMART. You're the one losing your neck, not ME.

You may call stealth cowardice... I call it SMART. You're the one losing your neck, not ME.

The very first fight I got in in my life was something I could not avoid. The other kid was hostile and aggressive towards me and escaping it using words was futile. However, what I could do was to incite him casually (because you don’t want to provoke someone directly) to throw the first punch. Suffice to say, I do not condone violence nor enjoy using it as a method of problem-resolution, but for some types of people, that is their preferred method. As he threw the first punch, I intercepted his arm and twisted it and hit him in the chest as retaliation. In a fight for legality reasons, it’s always good to allow someone to “throw the first punch” because then you become the victim to rightful defense. Of course the laws run deeper than that as I’ve spent time sitting in Coles reading the Canadian Criminal Code on Self Defense. Let’s just say I took him down… it was a nasty scene and essentially, because I was “defending” myself from danger, I did not get into major trouble by the teachers. The trick is also to “pretend you’re scared” and that “you’re attempting to leave the situation” and have witnesses (other kids) to prove it. I acted as if I didn’t want to be involved, that I was afraid, that way as the kid attacked me, I had the complete right to strike him back. Of course you’re only supposed to “use sufficient force to disable the assailant from doing further harm” … but I think I used a bit more power than that, LOL. So the moral of this story is that my in-game personality fits that of how I would play a game. Choose stealth and conversation over direct confrontation. 

Many games now, particularly RPG’s or ones that “require you to choose a path” often involves a ‘good’ or ‘bad’ choice… or perhaps in some games like Alpha Protocol, there is no “right” or “wrong” decisions… only a decision. Each choice you make will affect gameplay immediately or later on, but may be to your advantage at some point and disadvantage at others. These types of games in general do simulate “real life” unless it’s a very poorly chosen decision which leads to your death. Every day as humans we make countless decisions and these decisions may lead to immediate or future consequences – good or bad. When playing games, I often choose to walk a “good” or “positive” alignment. I will choose paths or a character-based on ‘good’ rather than ‘evil’. Playing games like Neverwinter Nights where your alignment affects how NPC (Non-Player Characters) view you and interact with you, I much prefer taking a “lawful” and “good” approach. In general, this is also how I prefer to lead my life, following a lawful and good approach – obviously that is not the case all the time, but I prefer to “play by the rules” and be a good person when I can.

The path of good and evil... which do YOU choose?

The path of good and evil... which do YOU choose?

However, then there are also less-than-glamorous scenarios like recently when I was playing The Saboteur, a game similar to Grand Theft Auto. You are given a large world to wander doing side-quests and fulfilling main-quests to advance the storyline. I can get just as frustrated in real-life as I can in a game, lol, if not more because you have to replay a scenario over-and-over again until you “pass” it. This had already been my 3rd attempt at having to escape the Nazis. I was almost out of their detection range, speeding away in a car with them tailing me when suddenly a civilian vehicle came out of no where, cut me off and I ended up slamming into them. I was so annoyed because now it means I needed to spend even more time getting the Nazis off my tail. However, that’s when my anger took over (and this scenario as scary as it may be, is a fairly good representation of me).  

I got out of my vehicle, which was obviously half blown-up after being machine-gunned by the Nazi chasers and hitting corners of the streets and NOW slamming into the civilian car. I walked over to the passenger side of the vehicle where I proceed to pull out a terror-machine gun (massive ass weapon) and shot the passenger through the window. I then walked over to the driver side, pulled the driver out on the ground and let him run away… momentarily that is, until I followed him slowly and planted 3 shots to the back of his head with a pistol. I was slightly satisified given these two idiots dented my car and while the Nazis had then caught up and started shooting at me, I got back in and made my escape. As evil as this may sound, it is rather indicative of my personality. When I get frustrated, I get even. There have been times my parents did not have the joy of sitting in my car when I was angry with another driver. I literally try to drive people off the road when they piss me off on the road. Call it road-rage or whatever you will, but hell, this scene in the game really shows the type of person I am!

When someone gets in the way of my goals...

When someone gets in the way of my goals...

 Do most players tend to game similar to their personalities? Do most choose a particular way of playing or particular characters as a result of their own “style” and personal habits? I’m not going to say that I never play something out-of-character, but most of the time I stick to my own classes, race, alignment and method-of-approach. When I beat a game using a certain combination, if the storyline or gameplay is different enough, I explore other ways of playing, but I will always “play myself” on the first run of the game. In fact, I often find it hard for me to “walk the path of evil” when making choices or decisions or rather, ones that contradict with who I am. I cannot recall the game, but there was one where I had to make the decision to drag another character to safety or leave them there to die. I would most certainly help, but given that this was a second run of the game, I decided to take the “bad” approach and resisting the temptation to ‘help’ the character was amazingly hard. Because it’s contrary to the person I am, watching the other character die (knowingly too) was tough. Yes, it is just a game – but even acting outside of myself within a game is something that makes the gears in my head turn. 

 If you’re a gamer or not, do you think that the actions you perform within a game reflect upon your own personality and real-life choices if that were you?

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